Ten Year Trivia

Photo by freestocks.org from Pexels 

Just for fun, and to celebrate my book Portal to Genius‘s upcoming 10th birthday, here are some things you may not know about my books, business, or whatever:

 

1) The name of my business “ThoughtsAlive” came out of a brainstorm in 2002 over the phone with friends Alanna Webb and Marnie Pehrson-Kuhns. Did you know they also pioneered the first online mall in 1996? True story.

2) Portal to Genius was originally going to be named “Hasenpfeffer in Munich”, but my co-author Garrett Gunderson feared that Google wouldn’t be able to provide a “did you mean…” suggestion when a user fails to spell it right.

3) In the year 2000, my husband showed me a letter from Bob Proctor, which asked if we had ever thought about teaching what we had learned. I HAD to do it!! So we invested about $9000 to send me to the training. I didn’t find out until recently that Bob’s letter caught my husband’s eye because my husband was interested in becoming a facilitator himself. When he saw how badly I wanted to go, he decided to keep his own interest a secret.

4) When I asked Jack Canfield (Chicken Soup for the Soul) for an endorsement for Jackrabbit Factor in 2005, he told me no, he was taking time off to be with his family. I had just read his book Success Principles, which has a chapter called “Ask, Ask, Ask”. So I asked to be an exception. He politely declined again, so I decided to impress him by asking again. He finally had to get blunt with me. I apologized profusely for my rudeness and learned a hard lesson in respecting other people’s agency. You can achieve your goals without any particular person doing any particular thing for you. 

5) The television interview pictured above from 2005 was horrible. I had 3 minutes to explain Jackrabbit Factor but I blanked out. Great picture, awful experience. The show was broadcast throughout the Phoenix metropolitan area and outlying mountain regions but I think I only sold one book.

6) As I wrote Portal to Genius in 2009, I had writer’s block for 6 months, until the turn of events described in Chapter 35 happened to US and got my creative juices flowing again. You can begin reading Portal chapters here.

7) I’ve lost count of how many times people have posted the following video on my Facebook page. I’m called the crazy rabbit lady, so this is right up my alley. It never gets old. If you haven’t seen it yet, I’m sure you’ll enjoy it just as much as I do!!

8) The Jackrabbit Factor has been translated into Spanish, Turkish, Chinese, and Persian. Whether they are good, accurate translations or not, I may never know.

9) Hidden Treasures was originally intended for my peers in the LDS faith (members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints), but has since organically achieved best-seller status on Amazon.com and received glowing reviews from people of Jewish, Buddhist, and other faith traditions. The principles are Universal, and its message is unifying. Have you read it yet? It’s free.

10) In 2003, I gathered a decade worth of event notes containing my biggest epiphanies from over 100 seminars, and prepared to weave them into a story. It was originally going to be about a sea creature that evolves into other life forms, ultimately making it to the surface as it learns each of those important lessons. Somehow it ended up being a story about Jackrabbits instead. I’m kind of glad about that.

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Merry Christmas!

We didn’t get cards out this year. So here is our Christmas family update:

2018 was a wild ride! Besides finally buying a home in August, here’s what else happened:

Trevan Householder still works at ISOS Tech, consulting small businesses in their implementation and use of Atlassian software. He spent 10 days in Europe on a cycling trek and is preparing to teach the Guided Mindset Mastery program for our business online at nights in 2019. He was released (like everyone else in the world during April Conference) from being a High Priest Group Leader, and now serves as the 11-year old Sunday School teacher and scout leader in our new ward (congregation).

Leslie Householder – I’m still blogging, podcasting, and teaching classes about Rare Faith (the kind of faith that causes things to happen). I also continue to work at the temple baptistry every Wednesday and love it. Two of my three books are finally on Audible, and with the help of (and relief provided by) my new Executive Assistant and Program Director Caroline Skrdla, I’ve finally started doing more events again. 2018 took me to various locations throughout Idaho, Utah, and Arizona. Next year I’ll be speaking in some of those locations again, as well as at BYU-Hawaii, and on a Caribbean cruise in December. Join my newsletter to stay in the know!

Jacob Householder is 26 and a senior at BYUI in Financial Economics. He works for a company called Success Engine, building marketing campaigns for small businesses, and serves as the Director of International Outreach at the Columbus Center for Constitutional Studies, for which he put together a Healing of America Conference in Rexburg, and attended a memorable trip to Israel. He has also played a key role in setting up the new community building for the non-profit Spark Freedom Center in Rexburg. He was selected for the Wheatley Leadership Scholarship and was also awarded an internship, for which he’ll go to Washington DC for training next month.

Nathan Householder is 23 and also attending BYUI. He’s also stayed busy working for Success Engine, and volunteering his spare time to BYUI Student Support, for both the Get Connected and I-Night events at the school. He also volunteered countless hours for the Healing of America Conference in Rexburg in October. He is a business major but is still considering all his options. He keeps the family laughing with his Memes for Days and is a compassionate big brother to all his siblings.

Kayli Householder is 20 and still serving in the Salt Lake City West mission of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, currently working with the deaf community in ASL. It’s been a rough year but she’s stuck it out and has learned and grown so much. She loves the people she works with, and we’re looking forward to her return on February 26, 2019.

Jared Householder is 19 and spent a semester on Scholarship at BYU Provo. He then came home for the summer/fall to work and save up his money. He plans to do another semester beginning in January, but this time from home while he continues to work at Geno’s Pizza in Queen Creek. He spends his free time developing his mad Nintendo skills and sometimes talks me into trying to beat him. When he’s not playing, I get on his case for wasting his talents.

Nicholas Householder is 17 and has been burning the candle at both ends. But he seems to like it that way because I can’t seem to get him to slow down. He is a Junior at Benjamin Franklin High School and currently taking two AP classes, attending EVIT for Anatomy/Physiology in prep for certification as a Massage Therapist, Myopractor, or Physical Therapist (he’s still deciding), and also works part time at Johnny Rockets. Sometimes he operates on 3-4 hours of sleep for days in a row. Despite his schedule, he still manages to go to the temple baptistry each week.

Bethany Householder is 15 and has taken up theater at the Queen Creek Performing Arts Center. She had a blast performing in Madagascar Jr., Saturday’s Warrior, and High School Musical 2. She loves to dance and loves spending time with her friends. She says she hates school but still works hard to do well. She surprises herself by doing better than she expects, more often than she’ll admit.

Sarah Householder is 12 and finally out of Primary. Wasn’t too pleased about the recent announcement, which – had it been announced just 12 months earlier – would have spared her the agony of the last eleven months. She LOVES Young Women’s and can’t wait for Girl’s Camp. She plays the cello (but recently asked if she could take a break), and also enjoys theater with her sister. She had a great time being in Saturday’s Warrior at the Queen Creek Performing Arts Center over the summer.

Tom (not pictured) is our cat and we love him.

At this time, we testify that nothing else matters as much as our love, devotion, and reliance upon our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, whose birth we celebrate. He is our ROCK, and our Redeemer. He has carried us through hard times, and given us the strength to put one foot in front of the other when we have felt like we had nothing left. It is only by Him and through Him that we accomplish anything worthy, and for that I am eternally grateful for His love, compassion, and mercy. May we always remember Him in all that we do.

We hope you have a wonderful Christmas and a very prosperous New Year.

With love, from the Householders

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Applying Rare Faith in the simple things

We moved into our new home last month, and we’ve been uncertain whether our beloved cat “Tom” would be able to go exploring without getting lost in the new environment. So we kept a careful watch on him for the first week, but eventually braved letting him out.

When he didn’t come back as quickly as usual, I began to feel worried. He finally showed up, but only after I went walking, calling for him up and down our street. I never saw him, but shortly after I gave up and came home, the kids discovered him at our door. He must have followed me there; I think he got our houses mixed up. After that, he never strayed far.

That was nearly six weeks ago. However, last week, after a night exploring, he came home looking like a wreck. We weren’t sure what happened, but his tail was matted and he walked with a limp.

We cleaned him up, and by morning he seemed to be himself again. Nevertheless, my kids decided that we should probably keep him inside from that point on. He’s getting older, and seems to be more forgetful. So one of my children put a sign on our front and back doors that said, “Don’t let Tom out”.

Last night, after the family was in bed, I noticed Tom sitting by the front door, longingly looking up at it. He seemed so sad and hopeful, waiting patiently for someone to notice and grant his freedom. He doesn’t make a noise, or try to get eye contact, he just looks up at the door and waits. Should I let him out? What if he doesn’t come home? What will the kids think if we lose him or if he gets hurt again because I “broke the rule”? I took a chance. I couldn’t stand to see him just waiting there, trusting someone would grant his wish without granting it, so out he went.

Usually when he goes out before bed, he’s waiting by the door again by morning. My son usually leaves for school first, so when I came downstairs, I assumed Tom was already somewhere in the house.

But I didn’t see him all morning, and after running my errands all day, I began to wonder if he ever made it home. Worried that I’d be in trouble with my family for letting him out, I hesitated to ask if anyone had seen him. Eventually I became concerned enough to ask each of the kids: “Have you seen Tom?”

No, no sign.

By 8:00 pm I was seriously concerned. Nobody had seen him to let him in again, and I knew he must be hungry, if he was still out there somewhere. So I went to a quiet place and offered up a prayer. I imagined my cat downstairs crunching his cat food. I imagined seeing him at the bottom of the stairs, and me saying, “Well, there you are!” And I imagined how grateful I would feel knowing he was safely home. Picturing him back in the home put a smile on my face, so I knew I was ready to begin. I spoke aloud:

“Dear Heavenly Father, I’m concerned about Tom. If it’s okay with you, will you please send some angels to go find him, and guide him home? I know you can hear me, and I know there are plenty of angels who are available, ready, and willing to help… [I imagined it again, and felt it again, as though it had happened] …thank you for bringing Tom home to us. He has been such a gift since he showed up 11 years ago.”

With that, I ended my prayer and chose not to worry. I imagined the angels on assignment looking for him. I also had a distinct thought, that they don’t magically wave their hand and – poof – he’s at the house, I thought maybe they didn’t immediately know where he was, either, and that they probably had to roam around a bit to find him. It made me think of the Law of Gestation. Maybe things take time, because the “unseen help” is, in many ways, just like us, and it can take time to do the things they’re trying to do. So I pictured them searching, and guiding him home, and even that put a smile on my face.

Fifteen minutes later I hear the front door open and my son yelled, “Tom’s back!”

That smile came back to my face, and I immediately knelt down and expressed my gratitude (again) for sending the help. These Rare Faith principles really do work, and they work – not just for the big things – but also for the simple, daily concerns like this one.

What if we approached our goals the way Tom approaches his? He doesn’t complain, he just focuses on his objective (literally, he just sits there looking at the door), and trusts that he’ll get the help he needs. Do you keep the image of what you want accomplished in view? Do you stay focused on it, with an expectant, trusting spirit? Or do you worry that your desires won’t be noticed? Do you beg and plead for them over and over again, while wondering what you’ll do if they aren’t met?

Try seeing your goal accomplished, and answer the question, “How will it feel when it is done?” But answer it with a feeling, not with words. Feel it. When you’ve done that, you’re ready to ask. Ask once. Then get back to your life and do what you can do for yourself. Trust that you’ve been heard. Trust that there is unseen help that cares about you, and is getting busy orchestrating the ideas, resources, and people you’ll need to accomplish it. Imagine that happening! And believe until it happens, even if it never does, don’t let YOU be the limiting factor. Your job is to believe. It will happen or it won’t. So what. Just make sure you did YOUR part.

I’d like to invite you to read more stories that help you build that belief. That’s what Portal to Genius was designed to do. Follow Richard and Felicity who are at the end of their financial rope, Morgan who needs a medical miracle for his son, and Ray who needs 4.5 million dollars by Wednesday. Be inspired as you see how each of them discover the key for themselves in Portal to Genius. (Read it FREE!)

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By small and simple things

Two Sundays ago I woke up and made Trevan a special birthday breakfast. Well, not incredibly special, just pancakes with whipped cream and strawberries, and scrambled eggs with sausage. But I did bring it to him in bed (a tradition in our family for those who have a birthday), so that was something.

After that, I went downstairs and turned on the Roku to see what program I could watch to kick off my Sabbath before the kids woke up. Originally, I thought I might find an episode of the discussions on the scriptures from BYUtv. My mom has raved about them many times. Since I interruptions were imminent and I enjoy those more when I can have uninterrupted focus, I instead selected a talk from the October 2017 General Conference. Scrolling through the sessions, I decided to watch John C. Pingree’s address called, “I have a work for Thee”.

His opening words were:

“To Moses, God declared, ‘I have a work for thee’ (Moses 1:6). Have you ever wondered if Heavenly Father has a work for you? Are there important things He has prepared you—and specifically you—to accomplish? I testify the answer is yes!”

And while I usually think that kind of a message is talking about my blog, books, and podcast, etc., I also know they very much refer to family history research and my family history calling (a.k.a. my assignment at church).

Normally, I feel like I should be making some kind of giant splash with my work, but the thought often overwhelms me and sometimes renders me motionless. Gratefully, in that moment, the Spirit gently nudged me with a simple idea of what I should do next. I was to put on my Sunday clothes and go to each of the 4 buildings in our stake, and post the pamphlet about “Language Skills Needed” on the bulletin boards at each of the buildings. That’s it. That’s all I needed to do. It wasn’t a big splash, but it planted a seed.

I knew that if I did my part to get those pamphlets posted, the Lord could guide the right people to notice them. I was reminded once again that it is by small and simple things that the Lord does his work. Knowing this helped me calm down and enjoy my day just a little better.

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Adversity and Unifying the Family

Back when all my kids still lived at home:

Journal Entry 2008:

Tonight was our weekly family night, an evening set aside to spend time with the kids and improve our family relationships through activities and instruction. However, more often than we’d like, it’s actually the only family argument to open and close with prayer (as songwriter Michael Mclean once lamented). Nevertheless, we persist. We trust that the habit alone serves as an adhesive to help our kids feel like they belong to something important as they grow and prepare to face the world on their own.

Tonight was contentious, probably because of me. Honestly, I didn’t feel like “playing.” I was in an emotional slump and my head ached (a Law of Rhythm thing methinks). But because it has long been established as a weekly tradition, my kids began asking me what we were going to be doing that evening. Trying to brush the topic aside until I could rest my headache away, my answer was simply, “I just don’t know yet.”

My 12 year-old Nathan begged me to take them to the park for dodge ball, a family favorite. My 15 year-old Jacob had too much homework so we compromised and played some in the back yard with him first. Then he was back to the books and the rest of us headed off to the park for some more serious battles.

I loosened up, forgot my headache. Eventually I got off the swing set with the baby and began playing dodge ball, too. Holding the baby helped; the family was gentle when tossing it in my direction, and I won at least one of the rounds. There was still the usual sibling-to-sibling bickering, but I believe everyone had plenty of fun.

Finally it was time to go home. We gathered to the van and Trevan (my husband) realized that the keys had been locked inside. Nathan suggested we call Jacob to drive them over. But our other set of keys had already disappeared months ago, and since we never needed the second set, we had never bothered with finding or replacing it.

Besides, Jacob isn’t old enough to drive.

Trevan suggested we say a prayer. We huddled together and he asked God to allow the door to somehow be unlocked so that we wouldn’t have to walk the mile home. Then he said,

“But if not, help us to enjoy the walk.”

The front passenger window was cracked about 2 1/2 inches. First we tried to see if any of the kids’ arms were skinny enough and long enough to reach the door lock.

No good.

Through the front window we could see, resting in front of a couple books on the dash, a mechanic’s wire claw (about two feet long, used for grabbing little things that get dropped inside an engine). I asked Trevan where the keys were and he said they were in the passenger cup holder in the center console. I asked if he thought that the wire grabber would be long enough to reach them, but it looked pretty short compared to the distance between the cracked window and the center console.

It was the only possible option at that point, so even though it was a long-shot remedy, we got to work trying to obtain that claw.

None of us could reach it through the narrow window crack. Kayli suggested we use one of the badminton rackets that we had brought with us. We first tried to use the racket to pull the lock up (to no avail – wrong angle). Then we tried to use it to bring the claw closer, but there was a thick “Jane Eyre” book on the dash blocking it.

The window opening was about 2.5 inches wide along the top, but only about 1.5 inches wide at the lower front gap (the part closest to the dash where the claw rested). Trevan force-pulled the window down to give me an additional 1/2 inch or so, and although I couldn’t reach the claw, I realized I could reach the fuzzy dash cover upon which the books and the claw sat. So I grabbed the cover and pulled it toward me until the claw was within reach.

Next we had to use the claw to reach the keys. But no matter who tried, the closest we could get to the cup holder with that claw was at best 4 inches. We were SO CLOSE! How can we have so much success getting this far only to have our efforts fail now?

There had to be a way.

Trevan discovered that if a person could be lifted higher than the van, their arm could get into the window opening a little better and reach a little farther. But there wasn’t anything to stand on except the wheel, two feet in front of where we needed to be.

After Trevan tried and then Nathan, I took a turn standing on the wheel, leaning 45 degrees onto Trevan and squeezing my arm into the narrow gap. Nathan supported me from behind so I wouldn’t fall backwards off of Trevan’s shoulder. Simultaneously, Trevan force-pulled the window down just enough for me to get my forearm in. Then, miraculously my elbow passed through. I managed to hook the keyring with the claw and began to pull them out. At one scary moment it felt like my arm might break before I had the chance to completely extract the claw and keys. Carefully maneuvering my arm and shoulder while leaning at that unnatural angle, I managed to pull them out.

After a round of “high-fives” we paused to give thanks, and then took a moment to help the kids see an important lesson in the experience:

Everything we needed was already there. We simply had to ask for help, and then get to work putting it all together in the right order.

The same is true in life. You already have all you need – the resources, the people, the brains – you just need to begin utilizing them in the right combination and in the right order. It can be hard, I know! It’s easy to feel blind to the solution. The good news is that as you make an attempt, every failure will lead you to think of the next idea, one after the other until you find the solution.

Just remember that it never helps to fret and fuss, moan and complain. Solutions are best (and sometimes ONLY) discovered by the person who is at peace, expectant, hopeful, and tenacious.

So ask God for what you need, and be willing to accept “no” for an answer (“but if not, help us to enjoy the walk.”) Then get to work finding the way to make your goal a reality. You might not yet have the keys you need to go where you want to go, but you do already have everything you need to begin the process of obtaining them.

And sometimes the solution only becomes apparent after a series of frustrating attempts. So keep trying!

If we had truly exhausted all possibilities without success, we would we have eventually tightened our shoelaces and started home on foot. I’m just glad we didn’t have to. In any case, I believe our family night was a success because we were unified for a common purpose (if only for 20-30 minutes), and it only happened because we first had adversity. (Law of Polarity)

And you know what? Solving the problem as a family turned out to be ten times more gratifying than the best game of dodgeball could ever be. Originally published April 8, 2008

For more about the laws of success, click here to read Hidden Treasures (free!)

Learn more about how you can Prosper the Family

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